EJ Voice – Year-End 2023

EJ Voice – Year-End 2023

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Environmental Justice Voice Newsletter

Year-End Edition

In this issue:

  • ICYMI: 9th Annual HBCU Climate Change Conference Recap
  • Justice40 Update
  • Worker Training Program Updates
  • Grant & Funding News
  • Community Engagement & Advocacy News
  • Community Based Organization (CBO) News
  • Team DSCEJ Highlights
  • Travelogue: Dr. Wright

COP28 Newsletter

COP28 Newsletter

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COP28 Newsletter

Dr. Beverly Wright, Founder and Executive Director of the Deep South Center for Environmental Justice, traveled to Dubai to participate in the 28th United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP28). Dr. Wright joined leaders from across the world to amplify voices of color and Indigenous peoples and call for world leaders to center their climate action plans and goals around communities disproportionately impacted by the climate crisis and environmental racism.

HBCU 9th Annual Climate Change Conference Recap

HBCU 9th Annual Climate Change Conference Recap

9th Annual HBCU Climate Change Conference Recap

 . . .Themed “Looking Back to Move Forward: Building aClimate Resilient Future with Vulnerable Communities,” the conference addressed the need to provide space for reflection and evaluation of where we are now and what paths we should take moving forward in our quest to fight climate change and to build climate-resilient communities. . . 

The More Things Change the More They Stay the Same

The More Things Change the More They Stay the Same

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The More Things Change, The More They Remain the Same: Living and Dying in Cancer Alley

​​​​​​​The Mississippi River Chemical Corridor, or Cancer Alley, produces one-fifth of the United States’ petrochemicals. In the early 1990s, Louisiana transformed this corridor, one of the poorest, slowest-growing sections of the state, into working-class communities. Once called a “massive human experiment,” the air, soil, and water in the Corridor absorb more toxic substances annually than do most entire states. To this day, Louisiana is consistently ranked among the states with the highest rates of cancer as a cause of death, with heart attack as the only one above it in 2019 and 2020, according to the Centers for Disease Control. 

2021-2022 Impact Report

2021-2022 Impact Report

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2021-2022 DSCEJ Impact Report

DSCEJ’s two-year impact report highlights the organization’s community-centered work through 2021 and 2022. DSCEJ’s efforts to empower communities historically impacted by environmental racism, promote community-led solutions to the climate crisis and put environmental justice at the center of all climate action were bolstered by philanthropic funding and high-profile engagements with federal, state, and local lawmakers.